University of Sussex

United Kingdom

Available Courses

This module starts from the observation that development is more than economic change and involves important social and cultural aspects. It begins with an interrogation of the way development practices and ideas are embedded in cultural contexts, and specifically how the development industry is historically and culturally entangled in Western conceptions of progress, rationality, and the individual. Against a view of culture as ‘tradition’ and an impediment to development we will examine different cultural conceptions of progress. This involves both alternate visions of future development as well as the negative impacts that development policies and interventions have on local people, communities and cultures. Questions of power and cultural relativism inevitably arise: what happens when different interests and commitments collide, and who or what determines the module development interventions take?

This module is an introduction to the research methods, techniques and skills used in development research and provides a foundation for the International Development thesis in the third year. The module is taught through workshops during which you focus on practical issues to do with research skills, as well as consider some of the more abstract issues that inform how we do research. The module encourages you to think about research ethics and the linkages between project design and methods of data collection.
During the module team work is emphasised, and many of the workshops involve hands-on group work.

Digital media saturates everyday life, re-organises cultural productions of all kinds, and re-mediates the teaching and learning environments which you will inhabit at Sussex. The course aims to examine this digital environment through both practical and theoretical perspectives. It enables you to understand and use digital tools to enhance and explore your study and to take a critically informed stance on your existing practices.
The course examines developments in new media with a particular emphasis on different uses of digital media, enabling you to make distinctions between kinds of material, genres and platforms. Through a practical approach it equips you to use digital media confidently to both enhance study and to understand the digital environment as media and cultural form.
The course covers topics including data visualisation, searching for resources, citation, catalogues, mapping, archiving, using social media, privacy, copyright and surveillance, digital media as a research area (e.g. how to research and ethics of researching tweets / Wikipedia / social forums) and the politics of software.
The course will draw upon a range of digital research platforms, including those owned and/or subscribed to by the university in order to provide a solid foundation for you to embark on future independent research.

This module explores anthropology as an exciting, ‘living’ subject, alive to the concerns of different communities and populations living across the globe, and as cutting edge in terms of the research conducted by anthropologists at Sussex as they actively engage with issues of social, cultural and global transformation. This is accomplished through a module structure which revolves around 5 core themes considered central to the subject that capture anthropological thinking on the subjects of culture, identity and representation: kinship; self and body; economy as culture; religion and politics; and work on the global-local interface.

This module invites you to explore how critical and imaginative thinking work productively together. In regular workshops, you develop your own writing, both of essays and creative texts.
The module is divided into three units. In the first, `Close Reading and Creativity’, you are introduced to writing that describes and performs the experience of reading, looking at work by authors such as Ali Smith, Marcel Proust, John Ruskin, and William Wordsworth. This unit encourages you to examine what is meant by `close reading’, and to explore links between reading and creativity.
In the second unit, `Intertextuality and Creative Writing’, we consider literary influence, examining works that are shaped by earlier texts. You will study texts by authors such as Angela Carter, H. Cixous, J. M. Coetzee, Nalo Hopkinson, Alice Walker and/or Virginia Woolf. From both a practical and theoretical point of view, we consider what these writers can teach us about the use of reading to create new works.
In the third unit, `The Critic as Writer’, you will study writers for whom acts of critical reading and writing overlap and co-habit with creative work. We consider writers such as Sigmund Freud, Denise Riley, Salman Rushdie, Edmund Spenser and/or W. B. Yeats. The creative potential of critical forms (such as the essay and biography) will be explored.
The three units help you develop key skills as a reader and writer of literary texts, building up to the creative-critical portfolio which you will produce by the end of the module. Each week you will have a lecture, followed by a seminar-workshop in which you discuss your critical thinking and creative practice in small groups.

This module provides a foundation of principles for human-centred design that will be relevant throughout your degree programme. Initially there is a focus on physical considerations, including a study of human limits for inclusive design. Later on people’s behaviour is considered and how design can help to address significant issues for society. We also consider contemporary adaptations that embrace social factors, including consumer behaviour and a services approach to design. Finally we adopt a global perspective and understand more about society in developing countries and how design can help to address concerns.

Topics will include: introduction to human factors, ergonomics, anthropometrics, the senses, mock ups to evaluate ergonomic principles, designing a handheld object (anthropometrics, anatomy and physiology of the hand), consumer behaviour, inclusive design, design for a sustainable society, cradle to cradle approaches, taking a systems approach to design, research methods for understanding lifestyle and context of use, global issues and design concerns.

How do we go about reading and interpreting a literary text? What are we trying to do when we analyse a work of literature? Are we trying to establish one correct interpretation? How do we decide that some interpretations are more valuable than others? Do we need to understand the original intentions of the author to understand what something means? Is it necessary to understand the historical or political situation from which a work emerged? Do readers interpret texts differently at different historical moments? Could our interpretations of texts be affected by forces beyond our control, forces such as the workings of language, unconscious desires, class, race, gender, sexuality or nationality? How is it that some texts, Shakespeare’s plays, for instance, are highly valued by our culture, while others have been lost or devalued? Who or what decides which literature will survive to be read and studied on English courses?
Critical Approaches 1 will suggest some ways of answering these large and difficult questions about interpretation, and aims to help you think in new ways about the work you do for your English degree at Sussex. In the autumn you will study the themes: “What is literature? Why does it matter?”, “Theories of Language and Meaning: Structuralism and Poststructuralism” and “Ideology and Discourse.”
Throughout the module you will read critical and theoretical essays and literary works that contribute to your understanding of these themes. The module will examine many different aspects of literary theory including new criticism, Marxism, structuralism, post-structuralism, deconstruction, feminism, post-colonial theory, psychoanalysis and queer theory.

The module aims to offer an introduction to a range of contemporary issues in global politics. Each week deals with a different global issue (e.g. development, poverty, economic sanctions, terrorism, emerging powers, migration, environment etc). The exact themes vary each year to cover the latest developments and crises in global politics. Most sessions start with an introduction to the theme by the module convenor and are followed by class activities (group discussion, presentations, debates, simulation games etc). The introduction by the convenor does not replicate the ‘required readings’, but expands or offers a different view to these readings and the issues under discussion. Similarly, student presentations do not focus on required readings but aim to cover contemporary ‘case-studies’ related to the themes under discussion.

This module explores media and politics and, more broadly, the media and questions of power. It focuses on current affairs with a stress on news; although other forms of factual content (for instance TV docudrama, web blogs, broadsheet lifestyle spin-offs) are also covered. This module considers the role media can play in producing our understanding of the globalizing world in which we live. It asks how media frames, organises, and contextualises events, both as they take place, and in relation to the collective memories that emerge after the event. It also asks how the media themselves are managed, manipulated, and influenced – variously by governments, media owners, professional newsrooms codes, and/or by public pressure.
You will examine the role the media play in relation to the citizen and the state. It is through the optic of citizenship, particularly in relation to the public sphere, that questions concerning the power of the media are addressed. You will also explore how a wide range of media contribute to the maintenance or erosion of a democratic society and an informed citizenship.

Access to education is at the heart of development and is central to the Millennium Development Goals. A lack of education reflects and reinforces poverty and access to quality education is a means for poverty reduction. This module will discuss the global agenda of Education for All, access to education, gender’s role and relationship with access to education, at all levels including primary, secondary and higher, and the concept of equity.
The module has three overlapping themes – Access, Equity, and Gender – which reveal the policy challenges of delivering education for all. The three themes build upon one another sequentially and the module moves through levels of education from pre school to university. Access to education has increased during the 15 years of the millenium development goals, but the ‘For All’ aspect has not been met. There are still millions of children who do not complete basic education, and higher education is still dominated by the socially privileged in many low, middle and high-income countries.

This module will provide an overview of key debates within moral psychology, such as the definition of morality, rationalism, emotionism, and nativism. Students will consider multiple theories and research which provides insight about how moral judgements are related to cognitions, emotions, and social identities. The consequences of the moral emotions will be discussed, considering implications for mental health, interpersonal relationships, and social equalities.

This module explores media and politics and, more broadly, the media and questions of power. It focuses on current affairs with a stress on news; although other forms of factual content (for instance TV docudrama, web blogs, broadsheet lifestyle spin-offs) are also covered.
The module considers the role media can play in producing our understanding of the globalizing world in which we live. It asks how media frame, organize, and contextualize events, both as they take place, and in relation to the collective memories that emerge after the event. It also asks how the media themselves are managed, manipulated, and influenced – variously by governments, media owners, professional newsrooms codes, and/or by public pressure.
Finally the module is centrally concerned with the role the media play in relation to the citizen and the state. It is through the optic of citizenship, particularly in relation to the public sphere, that questions concerning the power of the media are addressed. Thus the module explores how a wide range of media contribute to the maintenance or erosion of a democratic society and an informed citizenship.

This interdisciplinary module focuses on the profound impact of human migration on the world we live in. It explores a range of geographical, economic, political, social and cultural issues surrounding migration. The module introduces the key theories, concepts and ideas used to define and understand migration, and covers the main types, causes and consequences of migration. Following a roughly chronological sequence in order to foster a sense of historical continuity and change, it covers topics such as labour migration, refugees, irregular migration, integration and exclusion, migration and development, and the impact of gender on the migration process.

The module aims to provide students with an understanding of how research in cognitive neuroscience has informed our understanding of cognitive processes in the brain. Sussex has an excellent reputation of research in cognitive neuroscience and the course is taught by an expert in the field. Evidence is drawn from a wide variety of methods. These include case studies of brain-damaged individuals (similar to those featured in ‘The Man who Mistook his Wife for a Hat’), electrical recordings of ‘brainwaves’ (EEG), and neuroimaging using fMRI.
These methods provide unprecedented clues about the organization of cognition in the living human brain. Following a discussion of the main methods, the remaining lectures will be organised around a series of different cognitive processes such as: recognising objects and faces, space and action, memory and amnesia, brain development, the musical brain, executive control of behaviour, and understanding numbers.

This module addresses some of the most important texts in the history of western political philosophy. It covers the work of seven major political thinkers and aims to provide you with knowledge of the broad contours of modern political thought from the 17th to the 20th century. You will develop your ability to analyse philosophical arguments and to situate the texts studied in the appropriate historical contexts. Throughout, the aim will be to encourage close textual reading whilst developing an awareness of the wider themes and concepts that inform modern political thought.

This module introduces international education and development through three lenses. The module first examines why education is seen as important for development, drawing upon economic, rights based and socio cultural perspectives. It then examines the way education is measured and targets are set for development. The final section of the module introduces the international actors and political economy of delivering the education for all agenda.
The module provides grounding in education and international development, with a particular focus on the challenges facing resource-constrained and rapidly expanding educational systems. This will equip students with an understanding of the role of education in international development and develop critical, political and methodological perspectives.

This module takes an interdisciplinary view on the scientific basis of claims of global climate change, the human responsibility and the future implications of the change. In doing so it is largely based around theoretical and evidence based elements of climate science. Half of the module is dedicated to providing a sound basis for undergraduate level critical understanding of the science of contemporary climate change for the present-day and in the future. The other half provides the foundations for a critical understanding of the basis of future climate impacts.

The aim of this module is to help you to become reflective about the way arguments work by looking at a number of paradoxes.
Paradoxes puzzle and perplex us. If you’re going to sort them out, you have to clearly lay out the arguments and assumptions that lie behind the puzzlement and perplexity. And doing that helps you to see how to analyse arguments more generally.
You’ll see that most paradoxes have several solutions. Understanding the reasons in favour of different solutions will help you to see how arguments work, and how assumptions are often in play ones that you may not have thought about before.

Learning from and remembering experiences is critical for survival; failure of the psychobiological mechanisms underlying memory formation and retrieval can have severe and life-changing effects. In this module, students will gain knowledge of the neural basis of learning and memory and will develop an understanding of how learning and memory are impacted by, or are a feature of, various mental health conditions. Lectures may include the following topics: types of learning and memory; memory formation, persistence, and modulation; memory-related disorders and corresponding pre-clinical models.

Why do public policies differ from country to country? How can we explain these differences? Why are some governments more successful than others in solving particular policy problems?
These are the key questions that will be explored in this introductory module to comparative public policy.
The first part of the module explores theoretical issues relevant to the analysis of public policy, including both the stages of policy process and the main theories put forward to explain cross-national and temporal differences in public policy.
The second part of the module uses these theoretical tools to examine in detail specific policies, including welfare and social policy, pension policy, family policy, labour market policy, immigration policy, and education policy.
For each policy area, we will examine the roles of various actors, interests and institutions in the policy process, as well as the influence of broader structures and ideas in policy making.

Address
Kompleks Kementerian Pendidikan, Kebudayaan, Riset, dan Teknologi. Gedung D Lantai 18, Jalan Jenderal Sudirman, Pintu Satu, Senayan, Jakarta, Indonesia 10270

Email
Partners: [email protected]
Students: [email protected]