Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin

Berlin, Germany

Available Courses

This course aims to enable the students to get to know a number of Berlin museums focusing on key aspects of memory of the Second World War and Post-WWII migration, using anthropological methods. Students are encouraged to critically analyze these representations within larger theoretical frameworks of constructions, exploring the role of museums in rendering such constructions visible. The objective of this Bachelor-level course is to familiarize the students with a number of key Berlin museums.

The course will teach about the history, development and significance of the Berlin Wall within a national and global context, about its consequences for the city and for people’s lives. It will analyze fictional as well as non-fictional portrayals of the Berlin Wall from past and present, discuss their differences and meanings and thus explore how history is no unchangeable constant but continuously being constructed anew, reflecting not only individual opinions and memories but generational and social developments at large. Students will learn and/or practice key skills required for independent academic work as well as basic skills in the field of museum communication.

The course will map out important themes with regards to surveillance and its repercussions (e.g., visibility, identity, privacy and control). The course provides an overview of the interdisciplinary field of surveillance and covers the latest research in the following major areas: 1. Relationship between surveillance, power and social control; 2. Histories of Surveillance: GDR and the Stasi (especially in the context of Berlin) 2. The concept of privacy; 3. Surveillance in the arts and popular culture. The objective of this Bachelor-level course is to equip students with an in-depth understanding of the phenomenon of surveillance and enable them to read, understand and critically reflect on the most recent theoretical research in surveillance studies.

The objective of this Bachelor-level course is to equip students with an overview of the German philosophical activities in the 19th and early 20th centuries and, in particular, with an in-depth understanding of the philosophical circumstances which led to the establishment of the University of Berlin in 1809/10. The course will enable its participants to analyze and interpret central philosophical texts about the idea and purpose of the university, as well as to critically reflect from a historical and philosophical perspective upon the institution of the university in which they study.

In this course we will deal with current urban struggles in Berlin, put them into a greater theoretical, historical and societal context and use concrete case studies for a better and more comprehensive understanding. The objective of this course is to equip students with an in-depth understanding of current urban issues in Berlin, theoretically engage with the encountered case studies, and critically reflect on the topics.

In this course we will focus on contemporary theatre in Berlin. We will read and analyze dramatic texts and discuss different theories on theatre & performance studies. We will also experience real Berlin theatre and visit e.g. the Berliner Ensemble, the Maxim Gorki Theater and the Deutsches Theater, among others. This course offers an academic insight into the diverse Berlin theatre scene, its protagonists, cultural practices and audience structure. The objective of this Bachelor-level course is to equip students with an in-depth understanding of Berlin and enable them to read, understand and critically reflect on the most recent theoretical and empirical research in the field of theatre and performance studies.

The aim of the course is to introduce participants to the history of Nazi Germany. After a brief introduction to the historical and ideological backgrounds which led to the rise of the Nazi Regime we will turn to a detailed analysis of the event history which led to World War II. The course will answer the question why Germany was such an aggressive power and how the Nazi movement managed to gather broad public support within the majority of the German population until the end; while causing war and the death of millions of Jews, opponents etc. at the same time. Finally, we will discuss the effects of World War II, on world history; e.g. the Cold War, European Integration and decolonization.

The objective of this Bachelor-level course is to equip students with an in-depth understanding of the complexities of being African in Berlin, and to engage in discussion and information-sharing on the historical context of race and racism in Germany and its present day impacts on the (Black) African Diaspora.

This Bachelor level course will explore the link between the transformation and the rise of right-wing Illiberalism, mainly focusing on Germany as a case study. In doing so, it provides students with an introduction to the main tenets of liberal political theory and explores how these tenets are challenged in contemporary societies. Students will learn about the history of transformation in Germany and its impact on contemporary politics.

This course examines the protection regime pertaining to refugees and other forced migrants. It gives special attention to the evolving set of legal norms, institutions, and procedures that have emerged from the international community’s resolve to protect refugees and forced migrants. This course aims to provide students with the necessary knowledge and tools which will allow them to understand and position themselves critically with regard to a variety of issues related to refugees and other forced migrants.

Address
Kompleks Kementerian Pendidikan, Kebudayaan, Riset, dan Teknologi. Gedung D Lantai 18, Jalan Jenderal Sudirman, Pintu Satu, Senayan, Jakarta, Indonesia 10270

Email
Partners: [email protected]
Students: [email protected]